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Ebook

Israel 4 months ago updated by Alexander Shvets 4 months ago 1

The ebook has the same example as in the website? PHP, C++, JAVA?? or not?

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Hi Israel!


The book itself is language agnostic, the code snippets given in the book are in pseudocode. However, the book comes with an archive that contains actual examples in 8 programming languages (C#, C++, Java, PHP, Python, Ruby, Swift, TypeScript), all extensively documented with code comments.

As the name suggests, pseudocode generally does not actually obey the syntax rules of any particular language; there is no systematic standard form. Using pseudocode is a pretty common thing in education to explain general concepts. As far as I remember, I borrowed syntax from some of the examples on wikipedia and stuck to it throughout the whole book. Here's some more info about pseudocode: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pseudocode

Why did I use pseudocode at all?

1) While I think that most people would understand the Java or C# syntax as well, any book that uses specific programming language is automatically perceived as tailored for that language. However, I wanted my book to be language agnostic. It's easy to do on the web version, because you can produce quick language switchers for code examples, but not as easy for static ebooks. With that said, I also know that some code examples were needed anyway. Therefore I used pseudocode and supplied the archive with real code examples along with the book.

2) While I might produce special versions of the book with real examples in the future, there's another problem with this approach. Some languages just lack decent examples for specific patterns due to special features that they have out of the box or non-existent applications for that language. But I think people should need about those patterns anyway, since, who knows, one day you might be a PHP developer and tomorrow life might switch you to C#.

I hope this all makes sense. Let me know if you have further questions.

GOOD, I'M SATISFIED

Thank u very much for your fast reply!!

Satisfaction mark by Israel 4 months ago
Answer
Answered

Hi Israel!


The book itself is language agnostic, the code snippets given in the book are in pseudocode. However, the book comes with an archive that contains actual examples in 8 programming languages (C#, C++, Java, PHP, Python, Ruby, Swift, TypeScript), all extensively documented with code comments.

As the name suggests, pseudocode generally does not actually obey the syntax rules of any particular language; there is no systematic standard form. Using pseudocode is a pretty common thing in education to explain general concepts. As far as I remember, I borrowed syntax from some of the examples on wikipedia and stuck to it throughout the whole book. Here's some more info about pseudocode: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pseudocode

Why did I use pseudocode at all?

1) While I think that most people would understand the Java or C# syntax as well, any book that uses specific programming language is automatically perceived as tailored for that language. However, I wanted my book to be language agnostic. It's easy to do on the web version, because you can produce quick language switchers for code examples, but not as easy for static ebooks. With that said, I also know that some code examples were needed anyway. Therefore I used pseudocode and supplied the archive with real code examples along with the book.

2) While I might produce special versions of the book with real examples in the future, there's another problem with this approach. Some languages just lack decent examples for specific patterns due to special features that they have out of the box or non-existent applications for that language. But I think people should need about those patterns anyway, since, who knows, one day you might be a PHP developer and tomorrow life might switch you to C#.

I hope this all makes sense. Let me know if you have further questions.